Dr. Slovon  

 (410) 363-0393  


Veterinary Service

for the Quality Minded

Owings Mills
 Animal and Bird Hospital

   

Home : Frequently Asked Pet Health Questions : P-Q-R : CHRONIC PANCREATITIS : 

CHRONIC PANCREATITIS

It prevents diabetes by producing insulin to regulate the blood sugar level, as well as producing various chemical products needed for proper digestion of food.

After repeated attacks of “acute pancreatitis,” scarring of the pancreas prevents the ability of the pancreas to produce sufficient digestive enzymes to allow proper food digestion.

Pancreas attacks can be caused by various infections, traumatic injury such as automobile accidents, or improper diets causing the pancreas to overwork.

Signs of chronic pancreatitis include abnormal stools, weight loss while the animal continues to eat well, chronic vomiting, and flatulence (gas). Stool volume often is increased, greasy, and discolored.

Diets high in protein and carbohydrates, but low in fat are required. Needed digestive enzymes will be required to be added to the pet’s food for the rest of the pet’s life to insure proper food digestion required to maintain a healthy body.

Response to treatment will vary with the extent of permanent damage done to the pancreas.

We recommend maintaining the pet on a high quality diet such as Prescription Diet OMÒ.

A home-made diet is listed below, but usually is more expensive than the commercially prepared prescription diets:

1/2 cup Cream of Wheat cooked to make about 2 cups
1 1/2 cups creamed cottage cheese
1 large hard-cooked egg
2 tablespoons dried brewer’s yeast
3 tablespoons granulated sugar
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 teaspoon potassium chloride (salt substitute products)
1 teaspoon calcium phosphate (health food store, substitute=bone meal)
1 teaspoon calcium carbonate (ground egg shells--health food store)

Cook Cream of Wheat according to package directions. Cool. Add remaining ingredients and balanced vitamin-mineral supplement and mix well. Keep covered in the refrigerator. Yield: 2.2 lbs.

Feeding Guide: Feed sufficient amount to maintain normal body weight (approximately 3/4 pound of food/10 lbs. body weight).




© 2017 VetgateGlobal.com Terms and Conditions